Posts Tagged 'imperial porter'

PM#13 – “South Dublin Brewers” Imperial Porter

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This beer is to be part of a collaborative brew by the NHC’s South Dublin Brewers in order to fill a used 200-litre Bushmills barrel. The 10% Imperial Porter will be brewed and fermented separately by 9 different contributors and then racked to the barrel in order to undergo a period of aging and to draw out the oak and whiskey flavours from the barrel. I’ve already started collecting 330ml bottles for this beer – smaller measures are going to be necessary, I think!

Recipe

Boil Size: 17.00 l
Post Boil Volume: 15.11 l
Batch Size (fermenter): 15.00 l
Bottling Volume: 15.00 l
Estimated OG: 1.098 SG
Estimated Color: 57.7 SRM
Estimated IBU: 145.7 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 60.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 60.0 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients

1.500 kg Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM), 24.6 %
0.750 kg Amber Malt (22.0 SRM), 12.3 %
0.750 kg Brown Malt (65.0 SRM), 12.3 %
0.375 kg Chocolate Malt (450.0 SRM), 6.2 %
0.187 kg Black (Patent) Malt (500.0 SRM), 3.1 %
0.187 kg Caramel/Crystal Malt – 40L (40.0 SRM), 3.1 %
0.187 kg Caramel/Crystal Malt Р75L (75.0 SRM),  3.1 %
0.500 kg Light Dry Extract (8.0 SRM), 8.2 %
39 g Magnum [14.20 %] – Boil 60.0 min, 93.3 IBUs
1.650 kg Light Dry Extract [Boil for 20 min](8.0 SRM), 27.1 %
102 g Goldings, East Kent [5.80 %] – Boil 20.0, 37.0 IBUs
1.5 pkg Safale American  (DCL/Fermentis #US-05)

Brew Day #1 04/05/2013 – There’s a huge amount of roasted malt going into this brew (especially given that this is a partial mash) so I was a little apprehensive about how this would effect my mash pH, and consequently, my starch conversion. A fairly hefty amount of grain for me, but the mash was still pretty loose. I used about 12 litres of treated water in the mash, and kept around 6 litres for sparging. Mashed at around 67-68C. The smell from the mash was absolutely fantastic, huge espresso and caramel. The smell from the huge 20-minute flavour addition was fantastic too – 102g of freshly-opened East Kent Goldings. Huge amount of hop material at the end of the boil. The wort is so incredibly sweet and it has a huge amount of hop flavour. Hopefully, some of this will persist in the finished/aged beer. No hitches at all – I got just over 14 litres at a gravity of 1.098. REhydrated 1.5 packets of Safale US-05 and fermentation was well under way less than 12 hours later.

Brew Day #2 05/05/2013 – Every thing went according to plan, the same as yesterday’s brew day really. I’ve got about 28-29 litres in the fermenters. After lossed to trub, I should have 26 litres available for transfer to the barrel.

07/05/2013 – Both fermenters are happily bubbling, but I’m not getting the volcanic fermentation I was expecting. There’s maybe two inches of kreusen on top of the fermenting beer. Should be fine, but I’ll be checking the fermentation and gravity over the next 2 or 3 weeks.

09/05/2013 – Both fermenters have now slowed down and most of the kreusen has dropped. Still a bit of foam on top of both FVs though. I wasn’t quite expecting fermentation to be finished at this stage to be honest; but if there was a really good pitch rate then this would make sense.

03/03/2014 – This beer (and the South Dublin Brewers) won a silver medal in the “barrel-aged” category of the National Brewing Championship. Easy to see why from the samples I’ve tasted.

03/05/2014 – Emptied barrel and got a corny-full of porter (18 litres) from my contribution. Beer smells amazing, boozy but not harsh. The assembled brewers also cleaned out the barrel and racked in another 217 litres of freshly brewed English barleywine.

23/11/2014 – After several months sitting in the corny, I finally got around to bottling this today. Of course, there was no chance of any viable yeast being left in the beer, so I had to re-seed with some fresh US-05. I weighed out approximately 1-2g of dried yeast and re-hydrated in a ramekin in about 50ml of tap water. This is the first time I’ve re-seeded a beer with yeast. I added the yeast to the bottling bucket as the beer was being racked from the corny. Primed with 125g of corn sugar. Bottled in a variety of bottles (1 x 1l, 19 x 500ml, 21 x 330ml). The aroma from the beer is absolutely amazing.

26/11/2014 – Happy days. There’s visible signs of fermentation going on in the bottle. Plenty of bubbles coming out of solution when I gently shake the bottle. I’d kind of lost interest in this beer, I have to say, but now I’m really looking forward to having this fully conditioned for Christmas.

13/12/2014 – Uh-oh.. don’t know what’s happened here. Cracked open a 330ml bottle and it was as flat as a pancake.. I can’t think why this hasn’t carbonated. It got a fresh dose of yeast and what I thought was ample time conditioning at fermentation temperatures. Bit of research needed.

28/12/2014 – Brought the bottles back into the house, and gave them a gentle shake to stir the yeast (assuming there is any!) into suspension. I’ll leave it a few weeks before testing another bottle.

10/01/2015 – It seems as if there’s bubbles in the bottles. But I thought the same when I test the bottle last November too. Will leave another couple of weeks I think.

24/01/2015 – Finally!! It’s carbonated! Taking the bottle back into the warm house, rousing the yeast in the bottom of the bottles, and exercising a bit of patience has worked. The beer is so complex and sophisticated. It’s actually staggering how good quality is, certainly better than any commercial barrel-aged stout I’ve ever tasted.


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